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MIT Blossoms

BLOSSOMS video lessons are enriching students' learning experiences in high school classrooms from Brooklyn to Beirut to Bangalore. Its Video Library contains over 50 math and science lessons, all freely available to teachers as streaming video and Internet downloads and as DVDs and videotapes.
The BLOSSOMS Video Library contains lessons to use in your classroom. Every lesson is a complete resource that includes video segments, a teacher’s guide, downloadable hand-outs and a list of additional online resources relevant to the topic. MIT carefully crafts each BLOSSOMS lesson to make your classroom come alive. Each 50-minute lesson builds on math and science fundamentals by relating abstract concepts to the real world. The lessons intersperse video instruction with planned exercises that engage students in problem solving and critical thinking, helping students build the kind of gut knowledge that comes from hands-on experience. By guiding students through activities from beginning to end, BLOSSOMS lessons give students a sense of accomplishment and excitement.
While MIT faculty members and partnering educators in Jordan and Pakistan created the first BLOSSOMS lessons, today educators from around the world create and submit BLOSSOMS modules. MIT Blossoms welcomes contributors to join their international online community to learn more about their videos and to engage with educators worldwide who are looking for ways to enrich their students' classroom experiences and share their ideas.

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Creative Commons

Creative Commons helps you share your knowledge and creativity with the world. Creative Commons develops, supports, and stewards legal and technical infrastructure that maximizes digital creativity, sharing, and innovation.
There is no registration to use the Creative Commons licenses. Licensing a work is as simple as selecting which of the six licenses best meets your goals, and then marking your work in some way so that others know that you have chosen to release the work under the terms of that license. The license-choosing tool can help you select the right license.
Looking for music, video, writing, code, or other creative works? Creative Commons has got it covered: search for creative work through sources like Google and Flickr.
The CC Affiliate Network consists of 100+ affiliates working in over 70 jurisdictions to support and promote CC activities around the world. The teams engage in public outreach, community building, translation, research, publicity, and in general, promoting and sharing our mission.
Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools. Free, easy-to-use copyright licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your creative work — on conditions of your choice. CC licenses let you easily change your copyright terms from the default of “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved.”
Creative Commons licenses are not an alternative to copyright. They work alongside copyright and enable you to modify your copyright terms to best suit your needs.
What can Creative Commons do?
If you want to give people the right to share, use, and even build upon a work you’ve created, you should consider publishing it under a Creative Commons license. CC gives you flexibility (for example, you can choose to allow only non-commercial uses) and protects the people who use your work, so they don’t have to worry about copyright infringement, as long as they abide by the conditions you have specified.
If you’re looking for content that you can freely and legally use, there is a giant pool of CC-licensed creativity available to you. There are hundreds of millions of works — from songs and videos to scientific and academic material — available to the public for free and legal use under the terms of our copyright licenses, with more being contributed every day.
If you would like to see what kinds of companies and organizations are using Creative Commons licenses, visit our Who Uses CC? page.
If you would like to learn more about the different CC licenses, visit our licenses page.
For those creators wishing to opt out of copyright altogether, and to maximize the interoperability of data, Creative Commons also provides tools that allow work to be placed as squarely as possible in the public domain.

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Creative Commons - Get Creative

Get Creative is a short (6 mins) film that covers the basics of Creative Commons: it starts off with the example of an album of the White Stripes and then continues to explain how Creatove Commons turns the copyright issue around by encouraging people to make their media reusable from the stage of creation. Excellent introduction and promotion of CC.

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Creative Commons

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2009

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6 mins 30 secs

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LibriVox - public domain books podcasts

LibriVox is a project which objective is to make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet (generally podcasting). It has a database-driven catalog where every podcasting project can be found using the search page.
Once you have found and clicked the link for a book/recording you want to listen to, there are several things to note about the individual catalog pages. Each catalog page contains a description of the book, and helpful links about the book and author. You can also find a link to an online source for the text, if you wish to read along.
You'll find that you can download files in several places. You can download the individual chapters by choosing 128kbps MP3, 64kbps MP3 (smaller file size), or the Ogg Vorbis files. You can also find a link to a zip file of the whole book at the top. Another option is to find the recording with !BitTorrent, but not all recordings have been seeded.
The first step before you listen is to get the audio files onto your own computer. Once you have found an audiobook that interests you, there are many ways to download the files, and save them onto your computer. Each chapter is offered in three (3) formats: 64 Kbps MP3, 128 Kbps MP3, and Ogg Vorbis.
The audio files are hosted by the Internet Archive (see http://www.media-and-learning.eu/resource/internet-archive)
It is a totally volunteer, open source, free content, public domain project.
Librivox contains books in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian and a few other languages.

Wikiversity

Wikiversity is a learning community which aims to further the discovery and distribution of knowledge by helping people to learn and to share learning resources. Users can use Wikiversity to find information, ask questions, or learn more about a subject, to explore knowledge through advanced study and research and also to share their knowledge about a subject with others by building learning materials.
Wikiversity is available in 15 different languages, with a different number of learning resources for every language, varying from a few hundreds to over 20k.
The library of learning materials is growing and contains materials of all types, including a wide variety of multimedia course materials. They are designed, not just for self-study, but also as material which can be used in your classroom.
Everyone can create and revise teaching materials. Anyone can participate in the learning activities. Everyone can take a course. Everyone can teach a course. There are no entrance requirements and no fees. All content in Wikiversity is written collaboratively, using wiki software, and everyone is welcome to take part through using, adding and discussing content.

Story Builder - build stories on Google Docs

Google Docs can be used in a collaborative setting, so that multiple users edit and add on to each others' comments. Story Builder allows students to create a narrative around those changes by animating the discourse between fictional writers on a Google Doc. The app provide an easy way to create and edit lines of dialogue, set them to music The result is a story in the form of a sharable film.
Sample Applications for the Reading/Language Arts Classroom:
- Two of a book's characters can describe a shared event, told from their unique perspectives. For example, two fairy tale or fable characters can each explain their side of a story, contradicting and correcting each other as they go.
- Given a quote from a novel, two or three of the novel's main characters can begin discussing it, and possibly modifying it, to express their individual world views.
- In the book Flipped by Wendelin Van Draanen, we hear dual first person narratives of the book's events. Google Docs Story Builder would be the perfect tool for telling both protagonists' point of view in a novel such as this. You might even consider having students work in pairs, with each taking on the role of one of the book's characters.

200 Free Kids Educational Resources

The resources listed in this article, appeared at the beginning of 2013 on the website of OpenCulture, are found in a variety of formats: video lessons, apps, books, websites, etc.
They cover a wide range of topics, from language learning to narrative, from Mathematics and Sciences to Art and Visual Culture, from Geography and History to Music and Philosophy.
Every resource appears in the list categorised by topic and/or format and with a few-words description giving an idea of its characteristics and peculiarities.

The OneMinutesJr project

The OneMinutesJr project gives young people between 12 and 20 years of age from many corners of the globe the
opportunity to express themselves, speak out and learn audiovisual skills to communicate across borders, languages
and distances through 60 second videos.

The OneMinutesJr project now contains more than 2000 video clips and provides a fascinating insight into youth culture and interests around the globe. Supported by the European Cultural Foundation, the One Minutes Jr. Foundation and UNICEF amongst others, the one minute videos on the project web site vary a great deal, some have been sent in by individuals, others are results from workshops where young people are taught video production, editing and publishing skills.

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UNICEF, the One Minutes Jr. foundation

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