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Questioning, promoting and evaluating the use of streaming video to support student learning

This paper uses case studies to describe how streaming video is currently used to support student learning in post compulsory education in the UK. It describes the current role of streaming video and identifies processes that could extend the application of streaming in education. It attempts to establish a case for more formal evaluation and communication of educational processes involving streaming and identifies elements of a research agenda that could further develop the application of streaming technology in education.

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Dr. Kerry L. Shephard, Centre for Learning and Teaching, University of Southampton, UK

Year

2003

Length

13 pages

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Designing and implementing a PBL course on educational digital video production: Lessons learned from a design-based research

Article published in Educational Technology Research & Development.
This paper reports on a design-based research (DBR) process for designing, implementing, and refining a problem-based learning (PBL) course on educational digital video (DV) use and production at the University of Lapland’s Faculty of Education. The study focuses on the students’ learning processes and outcomes from the viewpoint of meaningful learning. The research subjects included two pilot students and ten students enrolled in the course. To promote the reliability of the findings, data of various kinds and from multiple sources were used, including video recordings of the PBL tutorial sessions. The results suggest that PBL offers a good model to support students’ knowledge and skills in producing and using educational DV. In addition, the results suggest that DV production can be used as a method to learn about the subject matter of the DVs.

Table of contents: 

Design-based research - Meaningful learning - Problem-based learning - Students-as-video-producers

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Päivi Hakkarainen

Year

2007

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ISSN 1042-1629 (Print) 1556-6501 (Online)

Length

Pages 211-228

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Literacy for the 21st Century: 2nd Edition

This book provides an overview & orientation guide to media literacy education with CML's plain language introduction to the basic elements of inquiry-based media education.

How does media literacy relate to the construction of media? How can critical thinking be taught and learned while students are producing media? It's not enough to know how to press buttons on technological equipment: thinking is even more important. Find out how to connect thinking with production. In a short and readable format, this book:
* Provides a complete framework for critical inquiry, using CML’s Five Core Concepts, and Five Key Questions for both construction and deconstruction of media, along with handouts.
* Gives explanations and Guiding Questions to illustrate how to connect the Key Questions when consuming or producing or participating with media.
* Provides in-depth explanations and the foundational role of the Five Key Questions of Media Literacy.
* Offers a sample inquiry into visual language: "How to Conduct a ‘Close Analysis' of a Media ‘Text.'"

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Developed and written by Elizabeth Thoman Founder Tessa Jolls President / CEO Revised and expanded by Tessa Jolls President / CEO Center for Media Literacy

Year

2008

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87 pages

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BEELDSPRAAK 2

This PDF is meant for audiovisual students but can be freely downloaded. It combines guidelines with assignments.

Deze PDF is bedoeld voor audiovisuele studenten maar can vrij gedownload worden. Het combineert richtlijnen met opdrachten.

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader

Look again

The guide includes advice on how to manage teaching and learning film in early years settings, classrooms and across the school, a model for learning progression, and an extensive list of further resources and resource providers.

Table of contents: 

Introduction
The case for Moving Image Education for 3–11 year-olds
Basic Teaching Techniques
Moving images and literacy
Founding Stage curriculum links
Moving Images across the curriculum
Managing teaching and learning
Becoming cineliterate
Resources
Glossary

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader

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British Film Institute Primary Education Working Group 2002-2003

Year

2003

ISBN

1-903786-11-8

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64 pages

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Spielfilme im Unterricht. Didaktik, Anregungen, Hinweise

Movies picture current moods, atmospheres and developments. They use different ways of showing their own view of the reality. As they are entertaining, young people like movies a lot.
This text suggests ways of working with movies in Literature, Language, Religious Education and Art-classes both in a pedagogically motivated as well as in a didactically reasonable way. The movies can both be used in terms of content or as a subject to formal analysis. If teachers manage to use that medium without destroying its aura, they can build on existing media competency and can foster new, improved abilities when it comes to handling media.

Table of contents: 

Introduction

Before didactics

Cinema, cinema

Movies in class

Didactical use of movies in class
• Resources
• Use of movies and copyright law

System requirements: 
Adobe Reader

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Matthias Wörther

Year

2005

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15 pages

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Towards Meaningful Learning through Digital Video Supported, Case Based Teaching

Article published in Australasian Journal of Educational Technology. This paper reports an action research case study in which a traditional lecture based, face to face Network Management course at the University of Lapland's Faculty of Social Sciences was developed into two different course versions resorting to case based teaching: a face to face version and an online version. In the face to face version, the teacher designed and produced three digital video supported case studies with the students to be used as learning material for the online version. The research focuses on finding out the student perspective on the following questions: (1) Can designing and producing digital video supported cases constitute a meaningful learning process for the students? (2) Can solving digital video supported cases in an online course support meaningful learning for the students? and (3) What roles do the digital videos play in the online students' meaningful learning process? The research indicates that both designing and producing, as well as solving the digital video supported cases, promoted especially the active and contextual aspects of the students' meaningful learning as well as the students' positive emotional involvement in the learning process. Several implications for further development of the Network Management course and for the development of university teaching across disciplines can be drawn from the results.

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Päivi Hakkarainen, Tarja Saarelainen and Heli Ruokamo, University of Lapland, Finland

Year

2007

Length

23 pages

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Digital Ethnography, a Vision of Students Today

This blog is maintained by a Kansas State University working group led by Dr. Michael Wesch dedicated to exploring and extending the possibilities of digital ethnography.

In 2007 Dr. Michael Wesch and a group of students of Kansas State University published two videos. They introduce themselves as: “a Kansas State University working group led by Dr. Michael Wesch dedicated to exploring and extending the possibilities of digital ethnography.” The video “A Vision of Students Today” gives a look into what students are really using technology for… where students are really spending their time: http://mediatedcultures.net/ksudigg/?p=119Related:
- Showcase / Mediated Culture, http://mediatedcultures.net/mediatedculture.htm
- video of 2007, summarizing some of the most important characteristics of students today - how they learn, what they need to learn, their goals, hopes, dreams, what their lives will be like, and what kinds of changes they will experience in their lifetime. The video was created by Michael Wesch in collaboration with 200 students at Kansas State University: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGCJ46vyR9o&feature=player_embedded

Technology, Video Gaming, and the Future of Schools

"Literacy In Digital Technology Is The New Generation Gap"
K-12 schools often find themselves resisting the latest technologies in order to preserve their existing methods of teaching and learning. When students begin to use cell phones, iPods, instant messaging, social networking sites, or massively multiplayer gaming, schools often respond with bans and filters to restrict student use. But students don’t stop finding innovative uses for the new technologies--they just do it outside of school. As a result, teachers and school leaders keep the integrity of their instructional programs but continue to fall behind the technological learning curve, and find it more difficult to integrate new learning tools in their classrooms.

Using Authentic Video in the Language classroom

Using film and video in the classroom is motivating and fun but can be daunting for the teacher. This book guides and supports teachers with plenty of practical suggestions for activities which can be used with drama, soap opera, comedy, sports programmes and documentaries. Many of the activities will lend themselves for use with DVD and webcasts.

Table of contents: 

Introduction
Part A
Video Drama
• Introduction
• Full-length feature films
• Other video drama
Non-fiction video
• Introduction
• Programmes about real life
• Short sequences and promotions

Part B
Activities with authentic video
• Video comprehension
• Activities (sorted alphabetically)
• Glossary

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