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Creative activity and its impact on student learning - issues of implementation

(Abstract) The use of filmmaking as a creative learning tool within the academic curriculum has been pioneered at the University of Sheffield. Filmmaking has been found to promote a lively, exciting and challenging environment in the classroom. It produces highly motivated students and makes learning fun by giving them a sense of empowerment and achievement. Perhaps more importantly, it allows students to tap into their creativity and imagination - abilities identified by many as the passport to a successful future. This paper covers a number of examples which describe the benefits to student learning; these include close engagement with their subject leading to insight and deeper understanding, as well as a range of transferable skills. This successful practice is looked at in relation to issues of assessment, evaluation and cost. Using a methodological approach that employs qualitative feedback interviews with students as research data, as well as referring to the literature, it presents a case for sustainable implementation.

Published in journal Innovations in Education and Teaching International, Volume 45, Issue 3 August 2008 , pages 281 - 288.

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Claire Allam, Learning and Teaching Services, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

Year

2008

ISBN

DOI: 10.1080/14703290802176196

Length

7 pages

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¿ PRODUCCION O PRODUCCIONES AUDIOVISUALES EN EL TERRENOEDUCATIVO ?

This publication is about the production of audiovisual productions in the educational field.

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Julio Cabero Almenara

Year

1992

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ISSN: 02114-3216

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8 pages

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Show us a story

Describing ways to use video in class - putting a focus on the respective product of the bfi.

Table of contents: 

Tasks of media pedagogy (media education)
The British Film Institute and moving image media education
Media pedagogy in the English curriculum
Media pedagogy in English schools
Moving image media education in primary schools
Moving image media education as perception training
Show us a story
Moving images in the classroom
Teaching with short movies
Story shorts and literacy
Starting Stories
Screening Shorts
Short movies in class

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader

Videoaufzeichnungen als methodische Grundlage zur Förderung der mündlichen Argumentationsfähigkeit in der Sekundarstufe

Video recordings can be an important means of fostering the ability to debate in school. The writer offers curriculum goals, thoughts about the complexity of debates, suggestions and reasons for the use of video recordings in class. The step-by-step instructions for developing a “debating curriculum” help putting that process into a structure.

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Some preliminary remarks as an assessment

Thoughts about curriculum goals

About the complexity of debates

Suggestions and reasons for the use of video recordings to improve the ability to debate
• Aspect of motivation and reflection about the pupils’ own linguistic pattern
• Aspect of interaction and action-orientation
• Aspect of reflection about language using recorded TV-shows

Steps for developing a “debating curriculum”

System requirements: 
Adobe Reader

Non-optimal uses of video in the classroom

This paper examines some instructional practices concerning the non-optimal uses of video, films and other mass media in the K–12 classroom. Based on a six-year process of observing and interviewing teachers regularly in two school districts in Massachusetts, USA, this paper presents a typology of seven common patterns of non-optimal media use, instructional practices that diminish or weaken the value of film and video viewing as a learning tool. A telephone survey was conducted with a purposive sample of 130 middle-school and high-school teachers to provide additional evidence concerning teacher perceptions of the frequency of their colleagues’ non-optimal use of video. Teachers in the USA report that their colleagues frequently use media for non-educational purposes, including to fill time, to keep students quiet, as a break from learning, or as a reward for good behavior. The implications of non-optimal media use are considered in light of renewed interest in integrating media literacy into K–12 instruction.

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Renee Hobbs, Temple University, Philadelphia, USA

Year

2006

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15 pages

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Looking through Three ‘I’s: the Pedagogic Use of Streaming Video

"In this paper we introduce a way to analyse video use through what we have named the Three ‘I’s Framework – image, interactivity and integration. This conceptual framework seeks to provide a practical decision tool to help teaching staff and practitioners with the pedagogic design and development of video streaming resources for online learning. Our aim is to provide a way of understanding the role of video as it changes from a presentation tool to a focus for networked learning."

Although the pedagogic use of film and video has a long history, its widespread use has always been limited by production costs and delivery difficulties. In recent years costs of production have fallen and the web has emerged as a mainstream educational distribution medium. Video itself can be used in many ways: ‘talking head’, interviews, video diaries, video labs, simulations, instructional sequences, ‘fly on the wall’, video help etc. Through the browser, ‘streaming’ video sequences can be linked to slides, text conferencing, whiteboards, video conferencing, shared applications, online assessment and third party web sites. A major element of the JISC/DNER Click and Go Video project is to move beyond the current understanding of video as a purely presentational tool. The seamless combination of digital video with other tools offers an opportunity to experiment with video as a focus for networked learning. However there is an acute lack of pedagogic resources, research and evaluation on the use of video streaming for teaching and learning. The pedagogical challenge faced by teaching staff and practitioners is not only to choose the appropriate streaming technology but also to design meaningful learning events.

Table of contents: 

Abstract
Introduction
The Value of Video Streaming and the Three ‘I’s Framework
Towards a Decision Tool
Acknowledgments
References

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Clive Young, University of Manchester, UK Maria Asensio, Lancaster University, UK

Year

2002

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11 pages

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Videoconferencing Guidebook

This is a complete guidebook including technical and pedagogical tips for managing videconference sessions. A trouble shooting guide and glossary of terms are also included. This courseware is used during the videoconference training sessions offered by the university's IT Services.

Also see other videoconferencing resources: http://www.um.edu.mt/itservices/staff/facilities/videoconferencing/help

Video Modeling for Individuals with Autism: A Review of Model Types and Effects

Arizona State University Abstract Efficacy research on video modeling as an instructional approach for individuals with autism has been found to be a promising area for teachers and researchers. Over the last three decades the literature has shown successful use of video modeling for teaching a variety of social, academic, and functional skills. The purpose of this literature review is to describe one specific aspect of video modeling, namely, to examine video modeling studies from the perspective of the impact of the model. To this end studies have been categorized as models using adults, peers, self, point-of-view, and mixed model approaches. Descriptive summaries and analyses of outcomes are provided for each study. As a group, individuals with autism appear to have strengths processing visual stimuli (Bryan & Gast, 2000; Hodgdon, 1995) resulting in many instructional strategies comprised of a heavy emphasis on visual cues; for example, PECS, Social Stories, and individualized multimedia activity schedules (Bondy & Frost, 1994; Charlop-Christy, Carpenter, Le,...

Vorbereitende Überlegungen zur Unterrichtspraxis IV, Video/Film

Interviews with experts about how to "teach film".

Table of contents: 

Gespräch mit Christine Dollhofer (Interview with C.D.)
Gespräch mit Stefan Kurowski
Gespräch mit Gustav Ernst
Further exercises
Allgemeine Überlegungen zur Unterrichtbarkeit vonVideo/Film (General considerations about teachability of video/film)

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader

Berichterstattung im Fernsehen

Every day, pupils are subject to a whole load of information. TV and radio are still their most popular sources of information – especially so-called “infotainment” shows are watched a lot. The projects described in this text show the pupils how deceptive an apparently “objective” show can be. They learn actively how to use certain images and linguistic styles and how to analyze their effects. The detailed description of the respective lessons offers a lot of background knowledge and gives the instructors the chance to carry out similar projects in their own schools.

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Introduction: Trust – Look – Who

Project 1: Sports coverage
• Introduction: Is a sportscast an entertainment show?
• Filmed reality? – media-pedagogic classification
• …and action! – didactical-methodical practice
• Overview of the lessons
• Descriptions of the lessons with working sheets
• Go girls – results and experiences
• It’s not that hard – resources and media
• Some technology: a stand-alone system for video-editing

Project 2: ZAP – TV-channels and news coverage
• Introduction: Bad news are good news – just because they make good stories?
• Zapping between channels – media-pedagogic classification
• Events cast their shadows ahead – didactical-methodical practice
• Overview of the lessons
• Description of the single lessons in the subjects German and art with working sheets
• The longer, the better - results and experiences
• Everything fine? – resources and media

System requirements: 
Adobe Reader

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Christoph Ammon/Madeleine Braunagel/Rudolf Hollein

Year

2000

ISBN

3-403-03356-2

Length

84 pages

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