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Folk DC - Digital Children’s Folksongs for Language Learning

The Digital Children’s Folksongs for Language and Cultural Learning (Folk DC) project is a European Union project designed to motivate young language learners to engage with language learning through using Folk songs, and activities around the songs. The project aims to introduce an understanding of the number, richness and culture of other languages when children start to learn a foreign language and begin to understand the meaning of additional languages.

Songs are in 10 European languages (Czech, Danish, English, Finnish, Greek, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish, Turkish) and they are available both on YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/user/FolkDC2011) and on the FolkDC wiki (http://folkdc.wikispaces.com/Home), where you can also add your own song.

Scratch

Scratch is a programming language that makes it easy to create animations, interactive stories, animations, games, music, and art. The outcomes can be stored and shared on the web within the Scratch system.
It is not only an ideal tool for the creation of simple and attractive interactive and/or animated learning objects, but it also serves as a learning instrument for young people. By using Scratch learners learn not only to create and share Scratch outcomes but more importantly they learn mathematical, logical and computational ideas, while also learning to think creatively, reason systematically, and work collaboratively.
Scratch is at first sight a bit difficult to learn, but there is a (short and simple) manual that helps everyone getting started within minutes. It is not a full blown animation tool but it is a lot of fun and very rewarding to work with.
Scratch is developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab, with financial support from the National Science Foundation, Microsoft, Intel Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, Google, Iomega and MIT Media Lab research consortia.

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Wild Web Woods - Online Game

Wild Web Woods is a online game commissioned by the Council of Europe and designed to help children learn basic Internet safety rules. The game also promotes such key concepts and values underlying the work of the Council of Europe as democracy, respect for others and children’s rights. The game, mainly for children between 7 and 10, is available in more than 20 languages and is supported by a teacher’s guide to assist educators in helping children to use the Internet safely and responsibly. The Guide is structured in eight lessons which provide educators with explanations, tips and practical exercises for children on topics such as managing online identity, learning about children’s rights, how much time they should spend online, privacy and security.

Center for European Union Education and Youth Programmes

The mission of the Turkish Center for European Union Education and Youth Programmes is providing close coordination with the public institutions, public and private institutions, public and private schools, private sector, non-governmental institutions, local authorities, professional organizations and youth organizations. It also contributes to dissemination of good practices and results of the projects in Turkey and abroad, and to making general evaluation and development of the programmes, making joint efforts for increasing network among various programmes.
The Turkish National Agency’s quarterly published magazine “Egitim ve Genclik”, due in three months time, is also available on this webpage: http://www.ua.gov.tr/index.cfm?action=detay&yayinid=19362C748B427A90339E....

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Center for European Union Education and Youth Programmes

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up-to-date

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Five Key Questions That Can Change the World: Deconstruction

Five Key Questions That Can Change the World: Deconstruction, is an innovative collection of 25 cornerstone lesson plans - five for each of CML's Five Key Questions of media literacy for consumers. Developed by the Center for Media Literacy, it's a ready-to-go resource that will help you help your students build a firm foundation in the skills of media literacy.
“Where do I start?” is a cry often heard from teachers who wish to introduce media literacy to their classrooms. Five Key Questions that can Change the World is an innovative collection of 25 cornerstone lesson plans – five for each of CML’s Five Key Questions of media literacy for deconstruction. The lessons are scalable activities from kindergarten through high school, and include both analysis activities and creative production projects. These sample lessons correlate with national (USA) education standards in language arts and social studies and integrate well with health, math and the arts.

NOTE: This is not a free resource, it costs $14.95 and can be ordered online at www.medialit.com/store

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Five Key Questions That Can Change the World: Deconstruction (Cinco preguntas clave que pueden cambiar el mundo: deconstrucción) es una innovadora colección de 25 planes de lección fundamentales - cinco para cada una de cinco preguntas clave de CML sobre la alfabetización mediática de los consumidores. Desarrollado por el Centro para la Educación Media, que es un recurso ya preparado que le ayudará a ayudar a sus estudiantes a construir una base sólida en las habilidades de la alfabetización mediática.
"¿Por dónde empiezo?" Es un grito a menudo escuchado de profesores que deseen introducir la alfabetización mediática a sus aulas. Las lecciones son actividades escalables desde el jardín de infancia hasta la escuela secundaria, e incluyen tanto las actividades de análisis y proyectos creativos de producción. Estas lecciones ejemplares se relacionan con los estándares nacionales de educación (EE.UU.) en artes del lenguaje y estudios sociales y se integran bien con la salud, las matemáticas y las artes.
NOTA: Esto no es un recurso gratuito, cuesta $ 14.95 y se pueden pedir en línea en www.medialit.com /

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Jeff Share, Tessa Jolls & Elizabeth Thoman, Center for Media Literacy (CML)

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2007

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Daisy and Drago

Daisy and Drago is an animation by 6-year old Turkish pupils under the guidance of two teachers from the Terakki Foundation Schools in Istanbul, Turkey, English teacher Miss. Özge Karaoğlu and animation teacher Mrs. Havva Kangal Erdoğan. Daisy and Drago aims to entertain young learners while they learn a foreign language (in this case English) and help them to build permanent learning in English. The pupils made drawings in their animation class, coloured them and by putting them behind each other, an animation was created. The pupils also dubbed the animation for a Turkish and an English version.

In a repetitive and funny story young children can learn to use the English phrases “I can – I can’t – Can you?” as the young girl Daisy invites her friend Drago to several of her favourite sports activities, but he can’t do them as he is a dragon and she is a human, but there is one thing that Drago can do...

By integrating Art and English lessons, pupils had the opportunity to learn and combine artistry and language skills during the production of this animation film and their audiovisual aids are now an important part of the resulting animation. They learned how to record their voices and sounds for the animation, but also to create and maintain teamwork and present their artwork to an audience.

This film has been used in English lessons as a teaching resource in English language teaching. The resulting animation is also part of lessons as Özge and Havva explain: “We have used this film in our kindergarten classes when we teach sports . Before we present the topic we show some snapshots of the video where they do different sports and we ask the kids to name them. We ask students about their favorite sports then we ask them which sports they can do. They look at the snapshots and decide what Daisy can do and what Drago can’t. After they watch the film, students role-play the story and discuss what Daisy and Drago can or can’t do. They also watch the film without the sound and then try to remember what the characters say in different scenes. Another related activity is preparing posters for the film and making puppets of the characters.” Follow-up stories were later created such as 'Daisy and Drago and the Magic Wand', ...

Daisy and Drago won the MEDEA Award for Creativity and Innovation 2009. You can watch a MEDEA Showcase about the project here: http://www.medea-awards.com/daisy-and-drago, and be sure to watch the "making of video" of Daisy and Drago’s narration: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=1352486947893285486#

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Özge Karaoğlu and Havva Kangal, Terakki Foundation School

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2008

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