digital storytelling

How-To-Guide Digital Storytelling Tools for Educators

This e-book explains digital storytelling and includes tutorials to implement available online tools for digital storytelling and resources through step-by-step tutorials. This e-book is licensed under Creative Commons, and the author's blog lists many more useful resources, downloadable how-to-guides and interesting blog posts: http://langwitches.org/

Table of contents: 

About the Author
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Available Tools for Digital Storytelling
- Audacity
- Google Maps
- Photo Story
- Mixbook
- VoiceThread
- Windows Movie Maker
- Wordle
Resources
- Digital Storytelling Resources
- Google Earth
- PhotoStory
- Audacity
- Google Maps
- Movie Production
- Windows Movie Maker
- Wordle
- Creative Commons Media
- Sound & Music
- Images

Educational Uses of Digital Storytelling

This website for teachers and students shows how multimedia can be integrated an educational activity such as digital storytelling. Originally begun by faculty members and graduate students in the Instructional Technology Program at the University of Houston College of Education, this website contains various external online resources (still images, audio files and video clips) that are examples of digital media projects. They can serve as a model for educators how they can utilize the power of accessible multimedia to engage students in today's K-12 and higher education classrooms.

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Educational Uses of Digital Storytelling, University of Houston College of Education

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Digital Storytelling

This wiki page lists various interesting resources related to digital storytelling in an educational context. It lists books, (media) resources, examples of stop motion & other techniques, as well as student-created stories.

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Dr. Alec Couros, Open Thinking Wiki

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Kindersite project

The Kindersite has 1,000s of links to games, songs and stories (not necessarily educationally focused) for young children and it is designed for kinder, child-care, preschool, kindergartens, elementary, primary schools and Special needs plus homeschool, libraries and the home.
The website offers early learners, with the aid of care-givers, a tool to find and use contents in the form of games, songs and stories.
Through a graphical interface it is possible for the child, alone or with assistance, to select contents. The content that is found to be most engaging or requested by a child can be added to a personal list, via an updateable 'My page' mechanism. It will also be possible for caregivers to build a 'my page' for a child with recommendations or required games.

MakeBeliefsComix - Create your own educational comic

MakebeliefsComix is a US based site that offers teachers and others resources and ideas on creating educational comics. It has also been recognised by Google and UNESCO as one of the world's most innovative websites in fostering literacy and reading.
MakeBeliefsComix has recently launched a new version of its website with added features to enrich the experience of students as they write, read and tell comic strip stories online.
A teacher’s guide is available, and the site can be used in Spanish, German, French, Italian, Portuguese and even Latin as well as English.

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Bill Zimmerman

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DigMo! Education and Creative Technologies Blog

This blog gives an interesting mix of stories on creatively using technology for education with "mini discoveries, tips, apps, and website finds", including topics such as digital storytelling software, student video works, and Apple products ... .The (anonymous) author is an Apple Distinguished Educator and Photographer.

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DigMo!

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Teaching with Comic Life 2, a guide to using Plasq’s Comic Life 2 in the Classroom

This free ebook is a teaching guide to using Plasq’s Comic Life 2 in the classroom, a digital story telling application. The guide covers the idea of visual story telling and communicating a narrative with only 6 photos. According to the author, the simple graphical user interface and intuitive drag and drop workflow makes Comic Life a perfect tool for classrooms both at primary and secondary level.

The guide includes a task: in small groups pupils will write and communicate a story using only eight photos and the Comic Life Application (you can buy from http://www.plasq.com).

Table of contents: 

Introduction to Comic Life 2
Story Telling with Comic Life
Task
Learning Outcomes
Transferable skills
Resources
Writing your Story
Telling a Story Comic Life
Step 1 : Select your layout Template
Step 2 : Importing Images
Step 3 : Adding Image Effects
Step 4 : Adding Text
Exporting and Sharing
Using Bluetooth to transfer Photos and Comics
Transferring Files with Bluetooth
Connecting with DigMo!

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DigMo!

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2011

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19 pages

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FÍS

FÍS is an inter-related group of projects, for schools, community and development, all based on the power of digital storytelling. The web portal incorporates Eurocreator www.eurocreator.com and digitalcreator www.digitalcreator.ie.

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Institute of Art Design and Technology (IADT)

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Learning from History / Lernen aus der Geschichte

Learning & Teaching offers teachers and other educators a free-of-charge resource pool of educational materials and methodological ideas. This website provides web seminars on themes in the field of historical and civic education, presented by experts from both academic and practical teaching contexts. As a registered user, you can take part in web seminars in real time and ask your own questions. Members can also share their own materials.

This website has four main areas: Learning & Teaching (in German), Participating & Networking, Learning Online & International Dialogue.

System requirements: 
Acrobat Reader, QuickTime

Playing Video Games Motives, Responses, and Consequences

From security training simulations to war games to role-playing games, to sports games to gambling, playing video games has become a social phenomena, and the increasing number of players that cross gender, culture, and age is on a dramatic upward trajectory. Playing Video Games: Motives, Responses, and Consequences integrates communication, psychology, and technology to examine the psychological and mediated aspects of playing video games. It is the first volume to delve deeply into these aspects of computer game play. It fits squarely into the media psychology arm of entertainment studies, the next big wave in media studies. The book targets one of the most popular and pervasive media in modern times, and it will serve to define the area of study and provide a theoretical spine for future research.

This unique and timely volume will appeal to scholars, researchers, and graduate students in media studies and mass communication, psychology, and marketing.

Table of contents: 

Foreword. Preface.
P. Vorderer, J. Bryant, K.M. Pieper, R. Weber, Playing Video Games as Entertainment.
M. Sellers, Designing the Experience of Interactive Play.

Part I: The Product. H. Lowood, A Brief Biography of Computer Games.
B.P. Smith, The (Computer) Games People Play.
S. Smith, Perps, Pimps, and Provocative Clothing: Examining Negative Content Patterns in Video Games.
E. Chan, P. Vorderer, Massively Multiplayer Online Games.

Part II: Motivation and Selection.
G.C. Klug, J. Schell, Why People Play Games: An Industry Perspective.
P. Ohler, G. Nieding, Why Play? An Evolutionary Perspective.
T. Hartmann, C. Klimmt, The Influence of Personality Factors on Computer Game Choice.
C. Klimmt, T. Hartmann, Effectance, Self-Efficacy, and the Motivation to Play Video Games.
M. von Salisch, C. Oppl, A. Kristen, What Attracts Children?
A.A. Raney, J.K. Smith, K. Baker, Adolescents and the Appeal of Video Games.
J. Bryant, J. Davies, Selective Exposure to Video Games.

Part III: Reception and Reaction Processes.
D. Williams, A Brief Social History of Game Play.
J.L. Sherry, K. Lucas, B.S. Greenberg, K. Lachlan, Video Game Uses and Gratifications as Predicators of Use and Game Preference.
R. Tamborini, P. Skalski, The Role of Presence in the Experience of Electronic Games.
S.M. Zehnder, S.D. Lipscomb, The Role of Music in Video Games.
K.M. Lee, N. Park, S-A. Jin, Narrative and Interactivity in Computer Games.
M.A. Shapiro, J. Pe¤a-Herborn, J.T. Hancock, Realism, Imagination, and Narrative Video Games.
A-S. Axelsson, T. Regan, Playing Online.
F.F. Steen, P.M. Greenfield, M.S. Davies, B. Tynes, What Went Wrong With The Sims Online: Cultural Learning and Barriers to Identification in a Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game.

Part IV: Effects and Consequences.
K.M. Lee, W. Peng, What Do We Know About Social and Psychological Effects of Computer Games? A Comprehensive Review of the Current Literature.
R. Weber, U. Ritterfeld, A. Kostygina, Aggression and Violence as Effects of Playing Violent Video Games?
K.E. Buckley, C.A. Anderson, A Theoretical Model of the Effects and Consequences of Playing Video Games. D.A. Lieberman, What Can We Learn From Playing Interactive Games?
U. Ritterfeld, R. Weber, Video Games for Entertainment and Education.
K. Durkin, Game Playing and Adolescents' Development.

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