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MEDEAnet webinar "Copyright Considerations for Educational Media Producers"

During this one hour webinar/live quiz 38 participants from 10 countries learned about the most important IPR and copyright rules you have to respect when you are developing your own media content for educational purposes. Participants were invited to test their knowledge of copyright and other IPR issues by means of an interactive question and answer session hosted by quizmaster Mathy Vanbuel (managing director of ATiT, Belgium and Secretary of MEDEA/Media & Learning Association) while main jury member Jeroen Verschakelen from ICRI - KULeuven, an expert in copyright and media law, provided the relevant legal and practical comments on copyright for educational media producers.

This webinar was aimed at educational media producers as well as teachers, educators and trainers interested in developing their own educational media. In a time where all sorts of different content seem to be available for free on the internet - from books, pictures, music, film to comprehensive scientific texts – it is important to know how you can use this content and also how you can protect content you have developed yourself which you also want to share via the web.

Before the end of 2012, these two experts are still available to answer questions about copyright and related cases in the online discussion in the Media & Learning Community of Practice. To see this discussion linked to this webinar go to http://media-and-learning.eu/content/copyright-considerations-for-educat...

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Creative Commons

Creative Commons helps you share your knowledge and creativity with the world. Creative Commons develops, supports, and stewards legal and technical infrastructure that maximizes digital creativity, sharing, and innovation.
There is no registration to use the Creative Commons licenses. Licensing a work is as simple as selecting which of the six licenses best meets your goals, and then marking your work in some way so that others know that you have chosen to release the work under the terms of that license. The license-choosing tool can help you select the right license.
Looking for music, video, writing, code, or other creative works? Creative Commons has got it covered: search for creative work through sources like Google and Flickr.
The CC Affiliate Network consists of 100+ affiliates working in over 70 jurisdictions to support and promote CC activities around the world. The teams engage in public outreach, community building, translation, research, publicity, and in general, promoting and sharing our mission.
Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools. Free, easy-to-use copyright licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your creative work — on conditions of your choice. CC licenses let you easily change your copyright terms from the default of “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved.”
Creative Commons licenses are not an alternative to copyright. They work alongside copyright and enable you to modify your copyright terms to best suit your needs.
What can Creative Commons do?
If you want to give people the right to share, use, and even build upon a work you’ve created, you should consider publishing it under a Creative Commons license. CC gives you flexibility (for example, you can choose to allow only non-commercial uses) and protects the people who use your work, so they don’t have to worry about copyright infringement, as long as they abide by the conditions you have specified.
If you’re looking for content that you can freely and legally use, there is a giant pool of CC-licensed creativity available to you. There are hundreds of millions of works — from songs and videos to scientific and academic material — available to the public for free and legal use under the terms of our copyright licenses, with more being contributed every day.
If you would like to see what kinds of companies and organizations are using Creative Commons licenses, visit our Who Uses CC? page.
If you would like to learn more about the different CC licenses, visit our licenses page.
For those creators wishing to opt out of copyright altogether, and to maximize the interoperability of data, Creative Commons also provides tools that allow work to be placed as squarely as possible in the public domain.

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IPR Helpdesk

This Helpline service provides tailor-made advice on your specific IP or IPR query – customized, straight-forwardly, comprehensibly and free of charge. Get in touch with a team of experienced lawyers via registration on this website, phone or fax and receive a qualified answer or examination of personal IP issue within three working days. In addition they offer free of charge training events on different aspects of IP management and IPR based on a practical and comprehensive training approach. Regular publications such as an eMail Newsletter and the Bulletin keep you updated on the latest developments in the field of IP and IPR.

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European Commission IPR Helpdesk

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Spanish court clears YouTube of copyright liability for uploaded videos

The main legal issues for UK Further and Higher education establishments tend to focus on data protection and legal hosting liability for content published on their site. This can include liability for content that breaches third party copyright. Based on recent case law, as long as establishments have a clear ‘take down’ policy for dealing with inappropriate or illegal content swiftly as soon as it is made aware of this, this appears defensible. The recent YouTube case in Spain demonstrates this.

Complementary material regarding a UK High Court case:
http://www.jisclegal.ac.uk/ManageContent/ViewDetail/tabid/243/ID/1243/Sw...

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Pinsent Masons

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2010

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OER IPR Support Project website

Information, advice and resources created by JISCLegal to help anyone creating OERs deal with the IPR and licensing issues associated with OER.

The homepage includes a video by Naomi Korn of the UK OER Support Project, setting out how to navigate the IPR issues around developing OERs.

A practical starter pack aims to help OER projects:
• Understand the thirty party rights associated with any content that you wish to make accessible and usable as OER and therefore help you to realise your rights clearance obligations
• Get to grips with Creative Commons Licences and select the most appropriate for your uses
• Develop a process for rights identification and clearance
• Adapt and use template rights clearance letters and model consent forms
• Understand where you might look to trace rights holders
• Develop a better understanding of the level of risk associated with content for which you might not be able to trace the rights holders or the rights holders are unknown
• Look for further information about IPR and licensing issues

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Including a starter pack and diagnostic tools

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JISCLegal

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2010

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A Fair(y) Use Tale

A video to illustrate copyright issues for the very young. It is American and not highly technical or objective but the general philosophy is applicable.

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Professor Eric Faden of Bucknell University

Year

2007

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Recording Lectures Podcast

Made by JISC Legal, this useful resource sets out some of the complicated IPR and other legal considerations around recording teaching sessions for online use. There is also a link to the accompanying paper. While this is based on UK law it is still useful in highlighting that recording and reusing a lecture is not a simple matter

Open for use? Steeve Wheeler on OERs and user-generated content

Steve Wheeler's keynote 'Open for Use?' at the 6th EDEN research workshop in Budapest (October 25th – 27th 2010) included food for thought regarding the implications of open educational resources / user generated content for copyright

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Steve Wheeler, Associate Professor of learning technology in the Faculty of Education at the University of Plymouth

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2010

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Copyright and digital technologies

An interesting video that reflects the views of young people in the UK who, it appears, are blissfully unaware of (or willfully disregard) copyright law when it applies to new technology as it does not meet their needs.

E-læring og jura

Danish website produced by UNI-C, on legal issues around e-learning. Contains articles, webcasts and cartoons (in Danish).

There is also a blog (http://forskningsnettet.dk/blog/23) where a panel of experts will take care of the questions around e-learning and the law.

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UNI-C

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