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PowToon - video creation

PowToon is a nice service for creating explanatory videos through a drag and drop process.
The mission is to "create the world’s most minimalist, user friendly and intuitive presentation software that allows someone with no technical or design skills to create engaging professional “look and feel” animated presentations".
The videos that users create feature digital paper cut-outs on a colorful background. This online tool let users create videos in the style made popular by Common Craft. It provides drawings of people and objects that users can arrange on blank canvas. After adding their narration to the arrangement users can publish their videos.
On the website (http://www.powtoon.com/tutorials/) there is a collection of tutorials on how to use the service.
PowToon's offers a free version for educators (http://www.powtoon.com/pricing/edu/), but it’s limited to 30 days and it limits videos to 45 seconds.
The service is in Beta version.

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© 2013 PowToon

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Comunicar

Comunicar is a scientific magazine which focuses on liniking education and communication.

The association for Media Literacy

Media literacy is an educational initiative that aims to increase students' understanding and enjoyment of how the media work, how they produce meaning, how they are organized, and how the media construct reality. AML is concerned with helping students develop an informed and critical understanding of the nature of the mass media, the techniques used by media industries, and the impact of these techniques. Media literacy also aims to provide students with the ability to create their own media products.

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What is Media literacy
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Association for Media Literacy

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up-to-date

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Media Edu

Mediaedu.co.uk is a site developed by Media Studies teachers and examiners.

It contains hundreds of pages of information, links and activities to help you with your coursework and revision.

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• About us
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Non-optimal uses of video in the classroom

This paper examines some instructional practices concerning the non-optimal uses of video, films and other mass media in the K–12 classroom. Based on a six-year process of observing and interviewing teachers regularly in two school districts in Massachusetts, USA, this paper presents a typology of seven common patterns of non-optimal media use, instructional practices that diminish or weaken the value of film and video viewing as a learning tool. A telephone survey was conducted with a purposive sample of 130 middle-school and high-school teachers to provide additional evidence concerning teacher perceptions of the frequency of their colleagues’ non-optimal use of video. Teachers in the USA report that their colleagues frequently use media for non-educational purposes, including to fill time, to keep students quiet, as a break from learning, or as a reward for good behavior. The implications of non-optimal media use are considered in light of renewed interest in integrating media literacy into K–12 instruction.

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Renee Hobbs, Temple University, Philadelphia, USA

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2006

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15 pages

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Questioning, promoting and evaluating the use of streaming video to support student learning

This paper uses case studies to describe how streaming video is currently used to support student learning in post compulsory education in the UK. It describes the current role of streaming video and identifies processes that could extend the application of streaming in education. It attempts to establish a case for more formal evaluation and communication of educational processes involving streaming and identifies elements of a research agenda that could further develop the application of streaming technology in education.

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Dr. Kerry L. Shephard, Centre for Learning and Teaching, University of Southampton, UK

Year

2003

Length

13 pages

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Keeping It Simple, Online and Personal: Teaching Interpersonal Communication Skills Via the World Wide Web

In this case study the authors discuss the creation of a digital video resource delivered via the WWW and CD-ROM for the teaching of interpersonal communication skills to distance students involved in a Masters of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) programme. The learning objectives of the resource, a walkthrough and an examination of the production of the digital video material are provided.

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Stephen Marshall, Rowena Cullen, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

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2003

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Audiences' judgements of speakers who use multimedia as a presentation aid: a contribution to training and assessment

Abstract: Multimedia technology in principle may help speakers to deliver more effective presentations. The present study examined what effectiveness might mean in terms of audience reaction. Understanding that may help educators to use multimedia more effectively themselves and to help their students to do so. Descriptors were elicited from audiences in response to a total of 56 live presentations in which speakers used multimedia as a presentation aid. Forty-two rating scales were defined. A total of 20 presentations were rated using the scales, with the scales presented in one of two different random orders. The order did not appear to affect the ratings. A factor analysis suggests that three factors may be most important in describing the audiences responses. The first describes audience assessment of how well researched and informative the presentation seemed. The second concerns the design of the multimedia, including how creative and imaginative it was. The third reflects how entertaining and how much fun the audience felt the experience as a whole to be. The results suggest a three-factor model that might be useful when designing multimedia-supported presentations, for providing proactive guidance and feedback when training speakers, and for assessment purposes.

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Bruce Christie, Jenny Collyer, London Metropolitan University, UK

Year

2005

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ISSN-0007-1013

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22 pages

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The Use of Video as a teaching resource in a new university

Abstract: This paper reports on a survey of the use of video as a teaching resource within one British University, drawing on evidence gathered during 1995 from fourteen Schools within its four Faculties. It identifies the factors and issues which influence the use of video in teaching, including management of video resources within the Schools; how video is used to support teaching strategies; and its perceived usefulness as a teaching resource. Findings note the extent to which video is used across the University; the factors that support or discourage its use; and the awareness and expectations that teaching staff have of video as a teaching tool. The discussion offers some recommendations as to how video use may be supported and improved within the University. The research could form the basis for a larger study to establish whether the findings from this survey may be typical of the picture in higher education generally.

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Barford J., Weston C., School of Information and Media, The Robert Gordon University, UK

Year

1997

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10 pages

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On-line video media for continuing professional development in dentistry

This project investigated the exploitation of on-line video media for the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of dentists. More specifically it focused on the evolution of the video media from video-conferencing to simple and complex webcasting. The study aimed to establish models of best practice for the use of both videoconferencing and webcasting in the training of dentists.

The three phases in the investigation progressed from a single screen presentation to three frame webcasting.
• Phase 1 consisted of videoconferencing and one-frame webcasting across the local area network (LAN).
• Phase 2 was a two-frame webcast across the LAN.
• Phase 3 a three-frame webcast across the Internet.

In each phase three different teaching scenarios were compared the lecture, seminar and one-to-one delivery. The same presenter and teaching material (Medical Emergencies) were used in each setting. The majority of participants were about to qualify as dental surgeons. A qualitative analysis was employed using questionnaires with a 5-point Likert scale, interviews and observational techniques. In the questionnaire, presentational, technical and educational issues were investigated. What clearly emerged was the very positive reaction towards the video media which were considered a most acceptable mode of delivering CPD (rated very good and good more than 80% of the time). Similarly, the presenter and teaching material scored highly in all phases and scenarios (good to very good, 4-5 on the Likert scale). Video-conferencing was deemed more suitable to special occasions such as major lectures, and webcasting was preferred in a one-to-one setting. Technically, webcasting did not make extra demands on the presenter, audio was more reliable and set up times were minimal compared to videoconferencing. However, sufficient webcasting bandwidth was necessary to prevent web-congestion. 'Interactivity' was essential to both recipient and presenter. It was appreciated most in Phase 3 webcasting where the chat box gave time to reflect before responding. A 'learning line' was proposed with videoconferencing and webcasting as part of the spectrum between face-to-face and on-line learning, respectively.

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Patricia A. Reynolds, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, GKT Dental Institute, King's College London, UK Robin Mason, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, UK

Year

2002

ISBN

ISSN:0360-1315

Length

33 pages

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