Using Authentic Video in the Language classroom

Using film and video in the classroom is motivating and fun but can be daunting for the teacher. This book guides and supports teachers with plenty of practical suggestions for activities which can be used with drama, soap opera, comedy, sports programmes and documentaries. Many of the activities will lend themselves for use with DVD and webcasts.

Table of contents: 

Part A
Video Drama
• Introduction
• Full-length feature films
• Other video drama
Non-fiction video
• Introduction
• Programmes about real life
• Short sequences and promotions

Part B
Activities with authentic video
• Video comprehension
• Activities (sorted alphabetically)
• Glossary


MediaEd is the site for media and moving image education in the UK. On this site you'll find teaching ideas, lesson plans and project reports, examples of student work, details of where you can get support and training or find workshops or education screenings for your students. MediaEd is currently still under construction so your feedback would be really useful.

Table of contents: 

Get started with…
• Teaching about film
• Teaching film-making
• Media literacy

• Teaching ideas
• Student work
• Resources
• Organisations
• Discussion
• What’s on

Reframing literacy

System requirements: 
Adobe Reader (optional)

Cable in the classroom

Cable in the Classroom is the U.S. cable industry’s education foundation. Its mission is to foster the use of cable content and technology to expand and enhance learning for children and youth nationwide.Cable in the Classroom advocates for the visionary, sensible and effective use of media in homes, schools, and communities.

Table of contents: 

• A Teacher’s Story
• How to get cable in your school
• Cable’s Educational TV programming and web resources
• Recording highlights monthly calendar
• Online Video
• eLECTIONS (interactive broadband game about running a political campaign)
• Windward (Interactive learning game about bearing the weather)
• Shakespeare (multimedia exploration of S.’s language and how his words have changed over the ages)
• Cable in the Classroom Magazine
• Threshold Magazine
• Media Smart
• Cable’s Leaders in Learning Awards
• Newsletters
• CIC Podcasts
• News
• Events
• FAQs

• Cable Resources for Learning
• Monthly Calendar of programming
• Windward
• Shakespeare
• Media Smart
• Cable’s Leaders in Learning Award
• Newsletters
• Cable in the Classroom Magazine
• CIC Podcasts
• News
• Events
• FAQs

Cable Resources for Learning
• On Cable TV & Web
• Recording Highlights
• Online Video
• Search TV Listings
• Learning with Cable
• Copyright & Recording
• Get Classroom Cable
• Newsletters
• Parent Tips
• Cable Company Locator
• Broadband Games
• DTV Transition


Media Smart
• Media Smart –Teachers
• Media Smart – Parents
• Digital Ethics
• Digital Safety
• Awards
• Media Smart Newsletter
• Learn More
• Point Smart. Click Safe.
• Polls & Surveys

System requirements: 
Adobe Reader

Playing Video Games Motives, Responses, and Consequences

From security training simulations to war games to role-playing games, to sports games to gambling, playing video games has become a social phenomena, and the increasing number of players that cross gender, culture, and age is on a dramatic upward trajectory. Playing Video Games: Motives, Responses, and Consequences integrates communication, psychology, and technology to examine the psychological and mediated aspects of playing video games. It is the first volume to delve deeply into these aspects of computer game play. It fits squarely into the media psychology arm of entertainment studies, the next big wave in media studies. The book targets one of the most popular and pervasive media in modern times, and it will serve to define the area of study and provide a theoretical spine for future research.

This unique and timely volume will appeal to scholars, researchers, and graduate students in media studies and mass communication, psychology, and marketing.

Table of contents: 

Foreword. Preface.
P. Vorderer, J. Bryant, K.M. Pieper, R. Weber, Playing Video Games as Entertainment.
M. Sellers, Designing the Experience of Interactive Play.

Part I: The Product. H. Lowood, A Brief Biography of Computer Games.
B.P. Smith, The (Computer) Games People Play.
S. Smith, Perps, Pimps, and Provocative Clothing: Examining Negative Content Patterns in Video Games.
E. Chan, P. Vorderer, Massively Multiplayer Online Games.

Part II: Motivation and Selection.
G.C. Klug, J. Schell, Why People Play Games: An Industry Perspective.
P. Ohler, G. Nieding, Why Play? An Evolutionary Perspective.
T. Hartmann, C. Klimmt, The Influence of Personality Factors on Computer Game Choice.
C. Klimmt, T. Hartmann, Effectance, Self-Efficacy, and the Motivation to Play Video Games.
M. von Salisch, C. Oppl, A. Kristen, What Attracts Children?
A.A. Raney, J.K. Smith, K. Baker, Adolescents and the Appeal of Video Games.
J. Bryant, J. Davies, Selective Exposure to Video Games.

Part III: Reception and Reaction Processes.
D. Williams, A Brief Social History of Game Play.
J.L. Sherry, K. Lucas, B.S. Greenberg, K. Lachlan, Video Game Uses and Gratifications as Predicators of Use and Game Preference.
R. Tamborini, P. Skalski, The Role of Presence in the Experience of Electronic Games.
S.M. Zehnder, S.D. Lipscomb, The Role of Music in Video Games.
K.M. Lee, N. Park, S-A. Jin, Narrative and Interactivity in Computer Games.
M.A. Shapiro, J. Pe¤a-Herborn, J.T. Hancock, Realism, Imagination, and Narrative Video Games.
A-S. Axelsson, T. Regan, Playing Online.
F.F. Steen, P.M. Greenfield, M.S. Davies, B. Tynes, What Went Wrong With The Sims Online: Cultural Learning and Barriers to Identification in a Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game.

Part IV: Effects and Consequences.
K.M. Lee, W. Peng, What Do We Know About Social and Psychological Effects of Computer Games? A Comprehensive Review of the Current Literature.
R. Weber, U. Ritterfeld, A. Kostygina, Aggression and Violence as Effects of Playing Violent Video Games?
K.E. Buckley, C.A. Anderson, A Theoretical Model of the Effects and Consequences of Playing Video Games. D.A. Lieberman, What Can We Learn From Playing Interactive Games?
U. Ritterfeld, R. Weber, Video Games for Entertainment and Education.
K. Durkin, Game Playing and Adolescents' Development.

Sponsors and Exhibitors

MediaSite Echo360 Kaltura